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Lisbon – our Portuguese apartment, tiles and laundry

Lisbon – our Portuguese apartment, tiles and laundry

We rent an apartment in Belém, Lisbon’s most monumental and historic hub. The area where you can witness the Age of Discovery, grandiose monuments and top museums.

We admittedly don’t live right next door to those pearls, still we are on Ajuda hill in Belém where I can brag about the closeness to some prime Portuguese property.

Ajuda hill is where the Portuguese king acquired a piece of land and build one of the most imposing residential palaces – Ajuda Palace… is the generic name. Maybe that is why it is off the beaten tourist track.

Okay, the truth is from one side, the palace seriously looks like a miserable ruin… which… does not matter at all because I was going to show you our residence anyhow.

Our area in Belém is very residential. And calm. It feels like being part of the neighbourhood family.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Within the micro-cosmos of our small street environment, I knew whose kids were running around, I fed and petted the neighbour’s dog, I watched the daily activities of those living around us (streets are narrow and windows facing each other, very close).

Dasza Traveler feeding dog in Lisbon

In turn, people watched us. And greeted. Which was nice.

Hello!

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Looking out the window.  We can see the Tagus river!

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

The trash truck comes everyday and everyday there was a new trash pile at the corner.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Peek into our habitat where we resided for two weeks. Mum and Tomek all excited.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

We rented through airbnb and paid 56 Euros per night. As usual, you can get a referral bonus of 25 Euros with us, for your first booking with airbnb.

Our bedroom.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Mum’s bedroom.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

The living room. BTW, can you believe that mum is actually left handed but was forced to write with her right hand in school?! Medieval times in the 1950s.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Every flat has its unique items. Tomek with the apartment’s rangers’ hat.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Decoration was plenty. The apartment had many paintings and vintage furniture. Some of it was just aged and covered up but hey, I do that everyday to my face.

Just a pretty picture of mum checking her picture souvenirs.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

We had a well sized kitchen and (sometimes) cooked at home.

Our everyday (very late) breakfasts looked like this. Mum prepared the daily fresh fruit salad (mango,papaya or any other fruits from the local grocery store) and she toasted each slice of Portuguese corn bread which turned crisp and tasty.

Further, we have a variety of delish goat cheese, olives (there is no meal without starter olives in Portugal), Portuguese fish paste spread and a very good (not to bitter not too sweet) Portuguese marmalade-jelly.

The jelly, in the top left corner, is made from Portuguese quinces, called marmelo. The English word marmalade comes from the Portuguese word marmelada, meaning quince preparation. It all makes sweet sense.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

The evening meal. We got hooked onto Portuguese style starter tapas.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Portuguese wine is fantastic. Can’t wait to try vinho do porto in Porto!

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

We buy all groceries in the mini mercado (mini supermarket) around the corner.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Outdoor entertainment can be seeked on laundry days. Clothes dryers are a rarity.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Welcome to a world of laundry – free of electricity-sucking dryers.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

The outdoor drying rack. There is no shame in showing off your knickers.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

I can only imagine how well Lisbonians must schedule their washing and drying.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Let’s take a walk around our hilly neighbourhood. Lisbon’s twin statue of the Rio de Janeiro-Jesus and the sibling of the Golden Gate Bridge, in the distance.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

First thing you might spot in Portugal are azulejos.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Azulejos are traditional Portuguese tiles.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Everywhere.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Pretty (tiles).

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Tile popularity for unicolour 50s tiles is fading.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Speaking of popularity. 21st century street art is obligatory. More so in times of crisis – as we noticed in Athens.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

The outdoor laundry+graffiti combo.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

I liked the post boxes. All have exactly the same classy correio (meaning mail) signs.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Some very antique doors still have the old lion head or hand doorknocker.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Portugal loves colours.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Contemporary residential architecture.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

We are in the capital but it feels so rural with many small shops, local groceries and pastelaria cafés. Even the supermarkets on the shopping streets are tiny.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

Lisbon. Well, I would say the capital is under construction.

Lisbon - apartment in Belem

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2 Comments

  1. It’s lovely how you’ve spotted all the details of the city here, sometimes it is hard to see the smaller picture!

    • One of the greatest luxuries in our new life is not having to hurry and rush through cities :) Thanks!

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