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Koreatown in Tokyo

Koreatown in Tokyo

Today we biked down to Koreatown located in Tokyo’s Shinjuku ward, curious to see if it compares to anything Korean we have seen while living in Seoul. It sure does!

We were amazed how big it is and how much of it it reminded us of Korea’s capital.

Think past the beautiful imperial palaces in Seoul, focus on Korea’s pop culture, fiery food, barbecues, bright cosmetic emporiums and you get a picture of Koreatown in Japan.

How to get there: take the Yamanote Line to Shin-Okubo Station, there is only one exit (an amazing thing at Tokyo’s huge stations) which leads onto Okubo Dori. Koreatown runs both east and west along Okubo Dori from the station.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Let’s go and feel some Korean vibe in Tokyo!

You can expect to be spoiled with many restaurants, grocery stores, and products from Korea. It is cool to see Hangul, Korean writing, all over the place, too.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

There is a large Korean community in Shin Okubo and sadly the area has received much news in the past, as it was the stage of anti-Korean demonstrations, where Japanese right wing protesters have demanded that ethnic Koreans go home. Upset over South Korea’s territorial claims to Takeshima island (referred to as Dokdo in Korean), they marched through the neighbourhood and made sure to deliver some negative publicity.

Tokyo, Japan

But mainly, Koreatown it is a peaceful paradise for comfort food. With all the hearty, meaty and smoky barbecue restaurants, which vegetarians will avoid only to be lured in by sweet, soft and easy-to-digest snacks. We did just that.

We had many kimchi tastings but there was so much for the sweet tooth we just couldn’t resist (must be an automatic cold weather body mechanism). Before we knew it we were filled up with strange dessert concoctions and our bags were full of interesting Korean sweets.

We also bought some toppoki (tteokbokki) and Korean pancake to cook at home.

 

The food pictures come first.

Hotok. Hotok is like a pancake, crunchy on the outside with a sweet centre, filled with cinnamon and honey. Long lines mean it is probably a good winter snack.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Chewy tteokbokki (or topokki, or toppoki) are a popular Korean street food. It is basically thin rice cakes in spicy Korean chilli sauce.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

Culinary ambassador tteokbokki proudly states on the package: “We introduce Korea traditional food to all of Japanese“.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Gimbap. The Korean version of sushi. Seaweed and rice rolls with an endless variety of fillings, most have meat.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Japanese-Korean fusion. Gimbap, tteokbokki and Korean pancake. United in a bento box.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Kimchi tasting. Kimchi is Korea’s queen of foods.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

Potato spirals. Soo popular in Seoul and incredibly greasy. The Korean version of crisps.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

Had to taste all of them across Koreatown.

Tokyo, Japan

 

We also tried a lot of stuff we had apparently missed to have in Korea.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

Some snacks were pretty good and some looked pretty shitty. I mean literally.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Seriously loved that shit. Sweet bean paste snack.

Tokyo, Japan

 

This street vendor made a fortune with fantastic Korean sweets. He created them magically from one round and hard honey droplet by gradually pulling it apart, into hundreds of hair-slim strings which he would then wrap around an almond or chocolate paste. It gives the strangest sensation in your mouth as if falling apart into sweet dust. Fascinating, strange and tasty at the same time.

Tokyo, Japan

 

For 1,000 yen a tiny box of confectioneries. Of course we bought it.

Tokyo, Japan

Chcesz te zdjecie?

Tokyo, Japan

 

Probably the tiniest food-ticket-vending machines I have seen.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

More food glimpses from Koreatown.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

A lot of the cookies and crackers were adorned with Korean soap stars.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

Drinks and cans were equally decorated with Korean idols.

Tokyo, Japan

 

No Koreatown without Korea’s major export magnet. K POP.

How do teens tell them apart? One thing Korean pop has taught me is to make a fool out of myself while dancing Gangnam style.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

With such a huge national competition of K-pop, at least some ends up being renamed to “on sale“.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

The K-pop bear.

Tokyo, Japan

 

The band name Big Bang came up a lot. I guess Top, Go and V.I are cool despite their strange names.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

Speaking of bang. I have learned a lot about various Korean bangs in Seoul. PC bang (PC 방) is one of them.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Korean boy groups adorn your coffee at Cafe Happy Time.

Tokyo, Japan

 

If you like more than two bands, you might get a little high on caffeine.

Tokyo, Japan

 

I kept wondering if there is a minimum age for Korean band members and how glasses might make them look a weeny bit older.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Which leads us to another fun thing to do in Koreatown: Korean beauty products.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

The ‘It item Mystic diamond placenta escargot’. Placenta cream must work wonders, this guy looks pretty wrinkle free.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

The perfect (oval) face look is often achieved through routine chin shavings. Korean beauty op’s are no taboo and socially a lot more acceptable than in the western world.

Tokyo, Japan

 

There is a big Japnaese Donki store in Koreatown which has adapted to sell many Korean products. You can get the same Korean stuff a lot cheaper here than at stores around the corner.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Some of the products were puzzling, although I am not sure how much Korea actually is in these ‘Under style guides’.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Snail cream is a runner in Seoul’s beauty stores, just as it is in Koreatown.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Snail. The Korean beauty elixir.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Koreatown is a lot of fun and you can spend a good half a day looking around.

 

Miscellaneous weird stuff I saw in Koreatown.

Barbie. Looks just a bit different to Mattel’s prototype.

Tokyo, Japan

 

You can play golf in Koreatown.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Japanese-Korean vending machine.

Tokyo, Japan

 

I cannot help but to get a good laugh out of interesting (Japanese? Korean?) English.

Tokyo, Japan

 

How about “whenever you need a satisfying sip or miss that savory scent…let’s be”.

Tokyo, Japan

 

I easily find that 1978 is a good date to be born.

Tokyo, Japan

 

We really enjoyed the unique atmosphere in Tokyo’s Koreatown. And a good Korean pancake for breakfast, the next day.

Tokyo, Japan

I hope you did, too. Until next time!

 

Today we biked down to Koreatown located in Tokyo’s Shinuku ward, curious to see if it compares to anything Korean we have seen while <a title=”Our apartment rental in Seoul” href=”https://www.ptraveler.com/2013/07/16/our-apartment-rental-in-seoul/” target=”_blank”>living in Seoul</a>. It sure does!  We were amazed how big it is and how much of it it reminded us of Korea’s capital. Think past the <a title=”Changgyeonggung Palace, Korean Sushi and Gimbap at Hyehwa” href=”https://www.ptraveler.com/2013/06/25/changgyeonggung-palace-korean-sushi-and-gimbap-at-hyehwa/” target=”_blank”>beautiful imperial palaces in Seoul</a>, focus on Korea’s pop culture, fiery food, barbecues, bright cosmetic emporiums and you get a picture of Koreatown in Japan.

How to get there: take the Yamanote Line to Shin Okubo Station, there is only one exit (an amazing thing at Tokyo’s huge stations) which leads onto Okubo Dori. Koreatown runs both east and west along Okubo Dori from the station.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06834-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Let’s go and feel some Korean vibe in Tokyo!

You can expect to be spoiled with many restaurants, grocery stores, and products from Korea. It is cool to see Hangul, Korean writing, all over the place, too.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06871-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06738-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06752-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06797-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06830-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

There is a large Korean community in Shin Okubo and sadly the area has received much news in the past, as it was the stage of anti-Korean demonstrations, where Japanese right wing protesters have demanded that ethnic Koreans go home. Upset over South Korea’s territorial claims to Takeshima island (referred to as Dokdo in Korean), they marched through the neighbourhood and made sure to deliver some negative publicity.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06853-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />
But mainly, Koreatown it is a peaceful paradise for comfort food. With all the hearty, meaty and smoky barbecue restaurants, which vegetarians will avoid only to be lured in by sweet, soft and easy-to-digest snacks. We did just that.

We had many kimchi tastings but there was so much for the sweet tooth we just couldn’t resist (must be an automatic cold weather body mechanism). Before we knew it we were filled up with strange dessert concoctions and our bags were full of interesting Korean sweets.

We also bought some Tebokki and Korean pancake to cook at home.

OUR FOOD PICTURES come first.

<em>Hotok</em>. Hotok is like a pancake, crunchy on the outside with a sweet centre, filled with cinnamon and honey. Long lines mean it is probably a good winter snack.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06740-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Chewy <em>tteokbokki (or topokki)</em> are a popular Korean street food. It is basically thin rice cakes in spicy Korean chilli sauce.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06748-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06750-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

Culinary ambassador tteokbokki proudly states on the package: “<em>We introduce Korea traditional food to all of Japanese</em>”.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06810-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

<em>Gimbap</em>. The Korean version of sushi. Seaweed and rice rolls with an endless variety of fillings, most have meat.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06819-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

Japanese-Korean fusion. Gimbap, tteokbokki and Korean pancake. United in a bento box.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06803-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

<em>Kimchi</em> tasting. Kimchi is Korea’s queen of foods.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06816-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06807-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

<em>Potato spirals</em>. Soo popular in Seoul and incredibly greasy. The Korean version of crisps.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06781-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06775-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

Had to taste all of them across Koreatown.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06745-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

We also tried a lot of stuff we had apparently missed to have in Korea.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06780-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06782-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06787-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

Some snacks were pretty good and some looked pretty shitty. I mean literally.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06772-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Seriously loved that shit. Sweet bean paste snack.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06770-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

This street vendor made a fortune with fantastic Korean sweets. He created them magically from one round and hard honey droplet by gradually pulling it apart, into hundreds of hair-slim strings which he would then wrap around an almond or chocolate paste. It gives the strangest sensation in your mouth as if falling apart into sweet dust. Fascinating, strange and tasty at the same time.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06861-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

For 1,000 yen a tiny box of confectioneries. Of course we bought it.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06865-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

Chcesz te zdjecie?

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06866-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Probably the tiniest food-ticket-vending machines I have seen.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06802-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06825-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

More food glimpses from Koreatown.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06767-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06768-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06812-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06749-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06751-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06808-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06804-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06805-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06806-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06789-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06790-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06791-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06868-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06821-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

A lot of the cookies and crackers were adorned with Korean soap stars.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06809-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06826-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Drinks and cans were equally decorated with Korean idols.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06764-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

No Koreatown without Korea’s major export magnet. K POP.

How do teens tell them apart? One thing Korean pop has taught me is to make a fool out of myself while dancing Gangnam style.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06857-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06847-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06747-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06849-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06829-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

With such a huge national competition of K-pop, at least some ends up being renamed to “<em>on sale</em>”.<strong>
</strong>

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06793-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06795-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

The K-pop bear.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06801-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

The band name <em>Big Bang</em> came up a lot. I guess Top, Go and V.I are cool despite their strange names.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06827-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06858-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06822-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06823-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Speaking of <em>bang</em>. I have learned a lot about various <a title=”Korean Bang at Seoul’s university area, Makgeolli &amp; Pollalla” href=”https://www.ptraveler.com/2013/07/13/korean-bang-at-seouls-university-area-makgeolli-pollalla/” target=”_blank”>Korean bangs in Seoul</a>. PC bang (PC 방) is one of them.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06833-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

Korean boy groups adorn your coffee at <em>Cafe Happy Time</em>.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06855-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

If you like more than two bands, you might get a little high on caffeine.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06824-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

I kept wondering if there is a minimum age for Korean band members and how glasses might make them look a weeny bit older.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06856-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

Which leads us to another fun thing to do in Koreatown.

KOREAN BEAUTY PRODUCTS

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06854-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06755-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06798-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

The ‘<em>It item</em> -<em> Mystic diamond placenta escargot'</em>. Placenta cream must work wonders, this guy looks pretty wrinkle free.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06799-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06757-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

The perfect (oval) face look is often achieved through routine chin shavings. <a title=”Beauty, Surgery, Love, Couple Fashion in Korea” href=”https://www.ptraveler.com/2013/06/23/beauty-surgery-love-couple-fashion-in-korea/” target=”_blank”>Korean beauty op’s</a> are no taboo and socially a lot more acceptable than in the western world.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06818-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

There is a big Japnaese <a title=”Don Quijote (ドン・キホーテ) – a Japanese Institution” href=”https://www.ptraveler.com/2013/05/30/don-quijote-%E3%83%89%E3%83%B3%E3%83%BB%E3%82%AD%E3%83%9B%E3%83%BC%E3%83%86-a-japanese-institution/” target=”_blank”> Donki store</a> in Koreatown which has adapted to sell many Korean products. You can get the same Korean stuff a lot cheaper here than at stores around the corner.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06758-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Some of the products were puzzling, although I am not sure how much Korea actually is in these ‘<em>Under style guides’.</em>

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06759-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

<em>Snail cream</em> is a runner in Seoul’s beauty stores, just as it is in Koreatown.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06760-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Snail. The Korean beauty elixir.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06761-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

Koreatown is a lot of fun and you can spend a good half a day looking around.

MISCELLANEOUS WEIRD STUFF I saw in Koreatown

Barbie. Looks just a bit different to Mattel’s prototype.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06753-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

You can play golf in Koreatown.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06746-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

Japanese-Korean vending machine.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06765-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

I cannot help but to get a good laugh out of interesting (Japanese?Korean?) English.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06766-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

How about “<em>whenever you need a satisfying sip or miss that savory scent…let’s be”. </em>

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06779-560×372-270.JPG” width=”372″ height=”560″ />

&nbsp;

I <em>easily find</em> that 1978 is a<em> good</em> date to be born.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06848-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

&nbsp;

We really enjoyed the unique atmosphere in Tokyo’s Koreatown. And a good Korean pancake for breakfast, the next day.

<img alt=”Tokyo, Japan” src=”/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tokyo/DSC06944-560×372.JPG” width=”560″ height=”372″ />

I hope you did, too. Until next time!

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