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100 Headpieces in LaForet Harajuku

100 Headpieces in LaForet Harajuku

Humanity has come a long way in the mastery of hatmaking, after that first animal skin was pulled over the head.

I could tell by the queue to 100 Headpieces, stretching for as long as the staircase in Tokyo’s fashion bastion LaForet, located in trend setter district Harajuku.

People came up to the last minute, to see the 100 Headpieces exhibition. Haute couture head coverings, created by Japanese fashion designer and stylist Katsuya Kamo for the biggies in the haute couture industry, like Chanel, Fendi, Kenzo, Junya Watanabe Comme de Garçons.

Amazing how many people visited the exhibition, especially on that last day, a few hours before it ended. Just like us.

Location: LaForet Museum (6F), 1-11-6 Jingumae, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo.  Tickets: 500 yen.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

The exhibition consisted of one cosy room with one hundred headpieces (I didn’t actually check if that number was correct), a few mannequins wearing full outfits hidden behind wooden walls with a thin slit to peek through, catwalk projections, Katsuya Kamo’s work desk and a small foyer with an arty prelude to 100 Headpieces, leading into the main exhibition room.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

100 Headpieces was a success and I was wondering, if hats are in for a come back. Most people wear hats when it is getting cold as protection against the elements.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

100 Headpieces was incredibly versatile. With baroque flowers, delicate paper coverings, African opulence, futuristic metal heads, Indian inspired feather headdress, restyled fashion wigs, 60s afro looks, recycled trash compositions and fetish SM inspired head masks.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

Fashionistas embrace hats as another accessory to highlight their style, thereby bringing a headpiece revival to the high street. More dramatic than a bag, shawl, glasses or a brooch, wearing a headpiece can make an impressive fashion statement.

For a long time hats were a social etiquette but for some reason there is not much room for elaborate head-decoration in modern street wear. It probably started in post war times when women found independence in employment and the 60s when head coverings were overtaken by hairdressers, who coloured, styled and sprayed women’s hair into hat-substitutes.

Today, I enjoyed to see wigs and head pieces merging and forming new trends. I also like to think of my fashion wig (yes I just bought one recently!) as a form of ‘hat’.

Like Harajuku fashion icon and singer Kyary Pamyu Pamyu, on a big billboard outside the exhibition.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

The highlight of the 100 Headpieces exhibition (for me) were those artisan wig-hat-headpieces.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

Tomek aka Apache.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

Nothing was about functionality or safety, no light straw hat sun-protections were on display. This was theatrical haute couture craftsmanship.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

Step down from the displayed pieces, there was also some hands-on heads-on experience corner.

Junya Watanabe Harajuku hat Dasza Traveler

 

And a reconstruction of Katsuya Kamo’s atelier.

Head Pieces, Laforet Harajuku Museum, Tokyo, Japan

 

I loved the show. It reminded me again of my secret dream to become a milliner, as well as of my boxes of collected vintage hats (a more openly shared secret passion).

In our much decorated apartment, I used to proudly hang up new hat additions like trophies, bringing back beautiful pieces from one of Cologne’s famous antique flea-markets. My headpieces were hanging on decorative golden hooks, adorning the whole wall in our hallway.

Every once in a while I would use the head pieces for special events. Like going to themed parties. Or doing vintage Christmas with mum and dad and our beagle Bella (the cutest furry being who shall rest in peace).

Vintage hats Daszs Traveler

I am so glad I made it to the show. A memento not to forget your passions.

And where they came from.

Mum, dad and me. With headpieces.

retro vintage hat family Dasza Traveler

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