Pages Navigation Menu

(How we make) Temaki in Tokyo

(How we make) Temaki in Tokyo

Today we stayed at home to have dinner. As unexceptional as that might be, the real stunner is that we prepared an authentic Japanese dinner for ourselves.

With the guidance of our host Asami, who lives in the house next door. She had the pleasant idea to show us how to make what she calls an ‘easy and quick Japanese family dinner‘.

Well, with her help it was because Asami had generously also bought all ingredients. The rice, the seafood, the greens and all the extras we needed to enjoy a fun evening and traditional Japanese meal. Temaki.

I hereby share Asami’s recipe – How to make Japanese Temaki

First, rinse the rice. Three cups of rice for three people is plenty – we had a scale inside the metal bowl from the rice cooker for measurement.

Tokyo, Japan

 

I think four times rinsing was good enough for our rice.

Tokyo, Japan

 

We then put the metal bowl into the rice cooker and it did the magic – perfectly cooking and timing the rice by itself. It was the first time we had used a rice cooker – such a useful thing!

Tokyo, Japan

 

We washed the shiso (Japanese herb/leaf) and kaiware (spicy sprouts). Oh and the cucumber, too!

Tokyo, Japan

 

We unwrapped the wasabi (Japanese spicy horseradish) which comes in a tube but for decorative purposes we placed it into this nice green patch (optional).

Tokyo, Japan

 

We tasted the tamanoi sushinoko sachet which is white sushi vinegar powder and tastes pretty acidic.

Tokyo, Japan

 

This is the incredible selection of the seafood Asami brought with her. Fresh (and raw) and delicious. Asami also labelled the picture for me!

Japanese Seafood names

 

Some close-ups of our temaki-fillings-to-be.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

We washed the wooden bowl for the rice (it has to be wet when the rice gets poured in). We also cut the nori (dried seaweed) sheets into rectangular shaped pieces.

Tokyo, Japan

 

I placed the rice into the (wet) wooden bowl.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Asami and Tomek fanned the rice to cool it down.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Next, Asami sprinkled the rice with vinegar powder and mixed it lightly.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Cooling the rice some more by the window.

Tokyo, Japan

 

In the meantime I messed around with the wooden spoons because I have a thing with rabbits lately, then washed them and gave each dinner participant one. They are used to scoop a tiny temaki portion of rice onto the nori sheet.

Tokyo, Japan

 

The seafood was cut into small slices and arranged gracefully onto the washed sprouts – alternated with cucumber (Asami taught us how to cut the cucumber the Japanese way to get thin strips). The fish roe was placed on another plate. We poured a bit of wasabi and soy sauce for everyone into separate small dishes.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

Et voila!

Tokyo, Japan

 

We said “Itadakimasu”, “Guten Appetit” and “Smacznego” and the temaki-forming-fun would begin!

Tokyo, Japan

 

Always happy Akira, Asami’s husband, joined us later after his long work day at their photography studio. Asami and Akira, two joyous and blithe spirits, who always know how to spoil us to bits, make the Japanese A-Team together. We are so lucky to have two hosts that treat us like family.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Anyhow, I digress into the joys of renting from our fantastic neighbours, so this is the final step of temaki making:

Place a bit of rice on the nori sheet, top up with sashimi, fish roe, sprouts, leafs… and roll them up in the nori. Dip into the soy-wasabi sauce and done. Repeat in various variations and enjoy!

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

This is how to cut nori sheets and roll perfect temaki cones.

temaki rolling1

temaki rolling2

I never actually managed to take a picture of our finished temaki because it was all to delicious after we started to get into it. (If you were actually wondering more about the soft-cone in the background, well it’s a long Halloween story.)

Tokyo, Japan

 

Let me tell you about dessert. I can proudly say that keeping the sachet of Polish wild-strawberry kisiel (jello) has finally paid off. I took it from Poland well after New Year, when we were leaving for this year’s travels… but never managed to actually cook it until now!

Asami gave it a test and prepared to try some typical Polish dessert -the glibbery-jelly kisiel. You will either love or hate it. Tomek cannot stand it and I am loving it. So easy and fast to cook. When the texture is still warm, it is simply the best.

Tokyo, Japan

 

In fact, Asami cooked it herself. The colour of the wild strawberry kisiel is pretty pink as well. How can anyone not like that.

Tokyo, Japan

 

So this is how the evening ends – with a Japanese-Polish dinner. Well, not exactly.
We chatted the night away sitting around Asami and Akira’s fireplace, drinking wine, sweet fizzy cocktails, exchanging wigs (nothing more than a fashion accessory in Japan) and snacking on a beautifully elongated Japanese plate full of oysters and other nibbles.

<º))))><  ♥ Next time I do temaki I will think back about a beautifully wonderful evening ♥  ><((((º>

Related posts:

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *