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Tokyo’s Suginami Animation Museum

Tokyo’s Suginami Animation Museum

We are in Japan, the mother of manga and anime, consequently a visit to Suginami Animation Museum in Tokyo is a must do.

And a lot of fun for adult kids like us.

 

Location: 3-29-5 Kamiogi Siginami-ku, Tokyo /www.sam.or.jp/ Admission: free!

 

A classy building. Marble and Manga.

Tokyo, Japan

 

The museum also features a theatre screening anime classics and the anime library with a large collection of visual and printed material.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Greeted by new releases in the anime world.

Tokyo, Japan

 

The Suginami souvenir stamp was our first stop. Stamps are a such a neat memento. Most major sights have a stamp station in Japan.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Right at the entrance, probably the most popular giant robot – Gundam. He is definitely the hugest action figure I have ever seen, standing tall on Tokyo’s reclaimed island and jaw dropping entertainment district Odaiba. But Gundam is also a cook and he has his own cafe in Akihabara, the extraordinary electronics and anime world of Tokyo. BTW, Gundam was invented in the late 70s and is still an icon.

Tokyo, Japan

 

I learned some historical facts at the chronological display of animation at the museum.

The first Japanese animation, created by manga artist Hekoten Shimokawa, was screened in 1917. The movie sadly got lost. But Nakamura-katana is a two minute anime from the same year, drawn by Sumikazu Kouchi and the only film that survived from the beginnings of anime in Japan.

To compete with Disney, in 1956 Toei-Doga was founded and produces the most famous anime to this day. Dragon Ball and One Piece series are known by every kid (and adult) in Japan.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Japanese anime has caught on overseas. I remember there was a Pikachu wave in the late 90s, all the German kiddos would be making “Pikachu” sounds and trading Pokémon cards.

Tokyo, Japan

 

I enjoyed to watch the short documentaries on how animations are created, the elaborate technique of drawing, colouring in and what contemporary artists had to say.

Tokyo, Japan

 

The museum has working desks of manga artists which gave the impression of actually walking into a manga production studio.

Tokyo, Japan

 

It was awesome to follow the steps of editing, adding sound (voice actors) and sound effects (computer compositions or outdoor recordings) to the animation work. I was amazed to read that it usually only takes about half a day to edit a 30 minute TV animation. One of the final steps in production is to do the voice overs with professional voice actors. Voice actors are as popular as movie stars in Japan.

I sure did a voice-over for Uran.

Tokyo, Japan

 

And of course, there were the figures.

Tokyo, Japan

 

Doki doki for otaku hearts.

Tokyo, Japan

 

There was a lot more interactive stuff. At the digital workshop, visitors can create anime, edit and make colourings on a computer.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

 

The first experiments with animation date back to the 19th century. In 1876 a French man, called Emile Reynaud created a rotating cylinder with 12 pictures. The Praxinoscope, a mirror mechanism, producing moving images – a big sensation and attraction at the Paris Expo.  Here is a cute version.

 

I remember my auntie saying I look like a manga after I had just gotten a fringe and left my hair open. At Suginami, I put theory to the test. Here is Dasza and Tomek aka manga.

Collage

Will share more Japanese fun in my next PT adventure!

For hardcore anime fans, I filmed about 9 min walking around the museum. And you can see my weird voice over – which I did in Polish. Sounds weird? Check it out!

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